Veterinary Services

We’re a veterinary clinic in Dixon, MO!

We strive to offer our clients the best state of the art technology and specialty veterinary care available. Our staff members are dedicated to the care of animals and they are willing to do whatever is necessary to make your pet comfortable with the highest quality standards of any veterinary facility.

Behavior Counseling

It is recommended that all puppies undergo training or behavior counseling, especially for first-time dog owners. We can assist you in the training process for your puppy. Puppies are not the only ones who need training, however. Many adult dogs need to undergo behavior counseling as well. They may have developed some bad habits like begging for food at the table or jumping up on guests. Some dogs display aggressive behavior toward people or other dogs. This can be especially true for dogs that were previously homeless or had neglectful owners.

Behavior counseling can help to correct these behavioral issues with training and, in some cases, medication. If you are concerned with your dog’s behavior, consult us. We can either set up behavior counseling appointments here in the office or direct you to experts that can provide the help you need.

Prescription Diets

There are many different types of food available for your pet, and each has its own benefits. Ask your Veterinarian which particular food is best for your pet. The food your pet eats depends on their age, size, breed as well as other factors.

If your pet has a health condition such as kidney disease, heart disease, cancer, stomach ailments, or obesity we offer Royal Canin prescription diets available to help them combat their ailment.

Your Veterinarian has extensive knowledge on this subject and can prescribe the best food for your pet.

We recommend Royal Canin Satiety Support. We carry both the wet and dry formulas in our clinic.

Boarding Services

Excited for your big vacation but don’t know who is going to care for your dog or cat while you’re gone? No need to worry, we are happy to watch your pet while you are away. We offer quality boarding services and take good care of your pet.

Your pet is provided with an ample living space, but they are not cooped up for all of their time here. We walk your dog four times a day, so they get the exercise they need. They also get a lot of playtimes to take their mind off of being away from home. All animals are fed twice a day and provided with comfortable bedding to sleep on. If your pet has a favorite toy, pillow, or other playthings bring it along for them. We want your dog or cat to be as comfortable as possible.

We love to have fun, but we do have a few rules. We require that your pet is up to date on their vaccinations for the safety of the other animals here. Call us if you have any questions about the required vaccinations. We also require that you drop off and pick up your pet during regular business hours.

We look forward to spending time with your pet!

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Geriatric Wellness

The aging process for our pets varies based on many factors. It is commonly thought that one year of a dog’s life is equal to 7 years of our lives. This is incorrect. The first 1-2 years of a dog’s life are when the dog reaches maturity. The aging process then differs on the size of the dog. Smaller dogs tend to live a few years longer than larger dogs on average. Health, exercise, and diet also affect the aging process in your dog. Most breeds of cats are considered “old” at about 8-10 years old.

Although your older pet may still be very active and healthy, his or her body has become more susceptible to chronic kidney disease, thyroid disease, diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, failing vision and hearing, and a general weakening of the body. Instead of waiting until the appearance of one or more of these diseases, we can choose to be vigilant and to focus on all of the things we can do to make his or her senior years happy, healthy and enjoyable for the both of you.

There is a lot we can do to help pets age well, provided we know what is happening in their bodies. More frequent check-ups and simple blood and urine tests will help us keep ahead of the aging process.

We strongly encourage everyone with cats ten years of age or older, and dogs eight years and older to schedule a wellness check up. We will give your pet a thorough physical examination, discuss your concerns, and perform a wellness test on a small sample of blood and urine.

Vaccinations – Cats

All cats should be vaccinated to prevent against harmful and potentially life-threatening diseases. The types of vaccines your cat should be given will vary based on the lifestyle of your cat. If your cat lives in the house and does not come into contact with other cats, only the basic vaccines are necessary. If your cat spends time outside and around other cats, the proper precautions should be taken with the necessary vaccinations.

Rabies

Rabies is a disease nearly everyone has heard of. It is contracted when an animal is bitten by another animal that has been infected. The disease is carried in the saliva. Rabies vaccinations are required in many states for cats. Even if you have an indoor cat, they should be vaccinated in case they get out, or by chance, an animal was to get into your house. In nearly all cases, an animal will need to be put down if it has been infected with rabies.

Panleukopenia Virus

The more common name for this virus is “distemper.” It is a highly contagious disease which is why vaccination is recommended. Symptoms include fever, seizures, loss of appetite, and possibly death. Kittens are born with a natural immunity for the first few weeks of their lives. Vaccinations should start at around eight weeks old, and there are series of about 3-4 follow-ups about two weeks apart. Your cat should also receive a vaccination every 1-3 years going forward.

Rhinotracheitis

Caused by the herpes virus, Rhinotracheitis is an upper respiratory infection that is highly contagious. The infection could prove to be fatal in young kittens, so the vaccination is highly recommended. The vaccine lasts for about three years, so follow up vaccinations are necessary.

Calicivirus

Calicivirus is a virus that causes an upper respiratory infection. It is very contagious through contact with infected cats. Symptoms include fever, gum disease, mouth ulcers, sneezing, among others. More advanced forms of the virus are more severe and can cause a fatality. Cats do not need to exhibit symptoms to transmit the disease to other cats. The contagious nature of this disease makes it important for your cat to receive a vaccination.

Feline Leukemia Virus

This is another virus that is spread through direct contact with an infected cat. For this reason, the vaccine is highly recommended for outdoor cats or cats that are frequently in contact with other cats. Indoor, solitary cats should still be vaccinated to prevent against the potentially fatal virus, but are not at as high a risk to contract it. Like all vaccines, there are some potential side effects. A small percentage of cats developed cancerous sarcomas where they were injected with the vaccine. Have a conversation with your vet if you have any questions about the vaccine.

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

This is a disease that has no cure and is fatal in most instances. The good news is that for households with only 1 or 2 cats only 1 in 5000 cats is affected. The vaccine for this disease has not proven to be very effective to this point, so most cats will not require this vaccination.

Chlamydiosis

This disease is much more prevalent in cats that live in a multiple cat environment. The most obvious symptom is usually conjunctivitis, and the disease is carried in the eye discharge of infected cats. Adverse reactions to the chlamydiosis vaccine occur at a higher rate than most vaccines, so if you have an indoor cat, it is usually not recommended. Speak with your vet if you have any questions about this vaccine.

Vaccinations – Dogs

Distemper

This is a viral disease that is easily spread through direct contact and contact with bodily fluids or contaminated food and water. Puppies are the most susceptible to the disease and also have the highest mortality rate from severe cases or complications from the disease. Vaccinations have proven to be effective, so it is important to have your puppy vaccinated. The disease can be treated if contracted but requires quarantining your dog from other dogs for many months, and the disease can also result in some long-term health problems.

Adenovirus Type 2

This virus leads to the infection commonly known as “kennel cough” in dogs. It is very contagious and is characterized by a hacking cough and a foamy white discharge. This vaccine is required in most areas.

Bordetella

Bordetella is a bacteria that can cause kennel cough. There are bacterins available to help prevent it.

Leptospirosis

This disease brings on symptoms of fever, vomiting, loss of appetite, and depression and it could lead to chronic kidney or liver disease. Although potentially severe, this disease is very uncommon in most areas. Depending on where you live this vaccination might not be necessary.

Parvovirus

This disease is more commonly referred to as “parvo” and is one of the leading causes of viral infections in dogs. It is highly contagious and transmitted by direct or indirect contact with contaminated feces. There are cardiac and intestinal forms of the disease, both of which are fatal in most cases when left untreated. The vaccination is highly recommended and is given in a series of shots starting when the puppy is about eight weeks old.

Coronavirus

Coronavirus is very similar to the intestinal form of parvovirus in its symptoms. It results in vomiting and diarrhea, mostly affecting puppies. The difference is that coronavirus, while still dangerous to your dog, is usually not fatal. For prevention keep your dog in clean conditions and be careful when around other dogs. Your dog can also be vaccinated for this disease, and it is usually good for their lifetime.

Lyme Disease

Ticks transmit Lyme disease. These small insects wooded areas and areas with tall, overgrown grass or brush. If you live in areas where these environments exist, it is smart to take proper precautions to prevent Lyme disease. If your dog does become ill with Lyme disease, you will notice that the dog will walk with a limp or favor the area where the tick has bitten it. The tick needs to be removed, and you should consult your vet for proper treatment.

Surgical Procedures

We routinely provide a wide array of basic elective surgical procedures in our office.

Routine Preventative Care

It is important for your pet to receive routine checkups just like it is for you. It allows us to make sure that your pet is healthy and also allows us to catch any health problems before they become serious. You should bring your dog or cat in for a checkup at least once a year, and once every six months for older pets.

During the visit, we will check your pets’ vitals, make sure all vaccinations are up to date, and perform any necessary blood work. Blood work can help to diagnose heartworm, Lyme disease, viral infections, and other diseases that can be treated more easily when detected early. The best way to combat these diseases is actually to stop them before they happen. There are many vaccines and medications available to prevent them. We will make sure your pet is taking the necessary medications to keep them safe.

Deworming is also a key method to keep your pets (and your family) free from getting sick. Deworming helps to prevent your pet from acquiring parasites. If your pet does become infected by a parasite, it is possible for them to spread it to anything or anyone they come into contact with. Schedule a deworming session for your pet today.

Dental Cleaning

Oral health is an important factor in your pet’s overall well-being. We perform routine check-ups on your pet’s teeth and gums, and we also recommend full cleanings once a year. This allows us to closely examine your pet’s mouth, check for lesions or abnormalities, remove tartar and plaque, and polish their teeth.

To perform the dental cleaning your pet will be put under anesthesia to prevent them from moving around and to allow the doctor to perform a full examination and cleaning. We make sure that your pet is comfortable and perfectly safe during the entire process. While your pet is under the doctor examines the mouth, gums, tongue, cheeks, and teeth. This can reveal any cases of lesions, gum disease, tooth decay, or other problems. When these are discovered, they can usually be handled during the treatment. After examining the mouth, the doctor will complete a full cleaning of the teeth and polish them thoroughly to give your pet a healthy, attractive set of teeth.

After the anesthesia wears off your pet is usually back to their normal self within minutes. Call us today to schedule a dental cleaning for your pet.

Grooming Services

Keep your dog looking clean and neat with our professional dog grooming service. Bring your dog in today for a full grooming including:

  • A bath complete with shampoo and conditioner treatment
  • Hair cut to your specifications
  • Full examination for fleas and ticks (and treatment if necessary)
  • Carefully trim your dog’s nails
  • Treatment to maintain the health of your dog’s skin and coat

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Emergency Medical Care

The Veterinarian-Client-Patient Relationship (VCPR) – A VCPR means that all of the following are required for After Hour Emergency Care. A Veterinarian-Client-Patient Relationship means that the veterinarian has recently:

1. seen and is personally acquainted with the keeping and care of the animal by virtue of an examination.

2. OR by medically appropriate and timely visits to the premises where the animal is kept.

Nutrition Counseling

Being overweight and trying to stay in shape is not only a problem for humans. Pets also need to be put on specific diets and workout plans to remain in good health. There are a number of deficiencies that pets can run into in regards to nutrition that must be observed.

By keeping your pet on a proper diet and workout plan, it can increase their life expectancy by up to 2-3 years. In addition to the extended life expectancy, you will also see a happier pet with fewer stomach issues, less sensitive skin, and a nicer coat.

Upon evaluating your pet’s current nutritional condition, we will make specific recommendations as to the type and amount of food your pet should be eating as well as any supplements. Also, we’ll provide you with a workout program for your pet that will keep them in tip top shape!

Flea and Tick Prevention

Fleas and ticks can cause discomfort, itchiness, allergic reactions, and can carry more serious diseases with them. The chance that your pet may get fleas or ticks depends on where you live and the environment around you. Fleas thrive in warmer weather but may go dormant during the winter in colder areas. Ticks tend to live in wooded areas or areas with high grass. You should keep your pet away from areas like this, but if they do go exploring, you should check them for ticks and fleas after.

Ticks and fleas also pose a threat because it is not just your pet that they can affect. They can reproduce and affect humans as well. If you notice small bites, especially around your ankles, you might have fleas in your house. Fleas and ticks can be eliminated with a medicated bath and proper treatment from your vet. It is important to clean your house, especially areas where your pet frequently lounges if they have fleas or ticks. As with most diseases, prevention is the greatest defense against ticks and fleas. There are many medications that we can recommend to make sure your pet is protected from these pests.

The greatest threat fleas and ticks pose are that they can be carriers of dangerous diseases. Ticks are the main carrier of Lyme disease, something that can affect both your pet and you. Fleas carry parasites as well like tapeworm and heartworm, so it is important to prevent them. If you currently don’t have your pet on any flea and tick medication, come see us soon!

Animal Cremation

Our Animal Cremation Services are done Locally.

Return Times are within One Week or 7 Days, depending on what Custom Design you select for your Pet Memorial Product.

Let Us Respect Your Beloved Pet Today.

Physical Exam

Physical exams are just as important for your pet as they are for you and me. They are probably even more important because your dog or cat can’t tell you when they need to go to the doctor! There may be signs from your pet that they are sick, such as laziness, lack of appetite, change in demeanor, among others. If you notice these symptoms you should schedule an appointment with your vet. Even if your pet seems to be perfectly healthy, you should bring them in for a physical exam at least once a year, and more often if they are older. Your pet’s exam will be very similar to a physical you would have, including checking:

Ears: The ears are checked for infections and also for parasites, as this is a common place for them to nest.

Eyes: The eyes are checked for cataracts, retina disease, signs of glaucoma, and other abnormalities. These can all results in blindness, so it is important to check for them regularly.

Mouth: Gum disease, lesions, tooth loss, and throat problems all affect dogs and cats. They could be signs of larger problems. Performing a full mouth examination allows us to diagnose any problems and take care of them before becoming serious.

Internal Organs: The internal organs are examined to check that they are functioning properly. The abdominal area can be checked by hand for any growths or tumors. A stethoscope is used to make sure the lungs are functioning properly and are also used to check heart rate. An ultrasound can also be performed to provide a view of the organs to visually check for anything out of the ordinary.

Skin and Coat: This is checked to make sure that there are no fleas, ticks or other parasites that have made your pet their home.

If any potential problems are uncovered further tests and examination may be necessary to rule out the disease, or properly diagnose it so that it can be treated.